Wimbledon reports £44m profit for 2021 Championships despite Covid

Wimbledon reports £44m profit for 2021 Championships despite much-reduced crowds and extra Covid costs such as block-booking a central London hotel

  • Wimbledon enjoyed a financial boost this year after 2020 event was cancelled
  • Tournament had extra Covid costs such as block-booking a central London hotel 
  • British game is already looking forward to a £30m bonus from the Government

Wimbledon enjoyed an impressive financial bounce back this summer, recording a Championships surplus of £44 million.

This was despite much-reduced crowds, especially in the first week, before 100% capacity was restored to the two main show courts from the quarter finals onwards.

The figures, released to All England Club members this month, suggest that the grass court Grand Slam has ridden out the pandemic to date with no lasting damage.

Wimbledon enjoyed a financial boost this year after the 2020 tournament was cancelled

When it was cancelled for 2020 the monetary hit was neutralised by a far-sighted insurance policy, although that was impossible to secure this year.

Considering the lower ticket sales and extra Covid costs involved with the 2021 edition – such as block booking a central London hotel – £44 million is a good result, although short of the £50.8 million announced in 2019.

The Lawn Tennis Association will receive the large majority of the surplus. The British game is already looking forward to a £30 million bonus from the government, which is granting the money to repair public courts around the country in the wake of Emma Raducanu’s triumph at the US Open.

Another sign of Wimbledon’s seemingly pandemic and recession-proof finances is that the recent sale of debentures for Court Number One were oversubscribed.

A new tranche of 1,250 five year ‘season tickets’ for the arena were disposed of for £46,000 each, which will help fund the ambitious and locally controversial expansion onto the neighbouring golf course.

Crowds were much-reduced, especially in the first week, at SW 19 due to Covid restrictions

From next year onwards they can expect to make even more money, because the tournament will operate for 14 straight days with the eradication of the traditional Sunday off. 

When it was cancelled for 2020 the monetary hit was neutralised by a far-sighted insurance policy, although that was impossible to secure this year.

Considering the lower ticket sales and extra Covid costs involved with the 2021 edition — such as block-booking a central London hotel — £44m is a good result, although short of the £50.8m announced in 2019.

The Lawn Tennis Association will receive the large majority of the surplus. 

The British game is already looking forward to a £30m bonus from the Government, which is granting the money to repair public courts around the country in the wake of Emma Raducanu’s triumph at the US Open. 

Another sign of Wimbledon’s seemingly pandemic and recession-proof finances is that the recent sale of debentures for Court No 1 were oversubscribed.

A new tranche of 1,250 five-year season tickets for the arena were disposed of for £46,000 each, which will help fund the ambitious and locally controversial expansion on to the neighbouring golf course.

From next year onwards they can expect to make even more money, because the tournament will operate for 14 straight days with the eradication of the traditional Sunday off.

Chairman Ian Hewitt also reported that, with strict Covid controls for spectators allowed in, incidents of infections associated with the 2021 Championships were statistically lower than in the wider community.




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